TWO . GATES . ART . STUDIO

 Toni Ciantar Poole  

STEP BY STEP CLASSES a few of our class packages 

YES, YOU CAN PAINT! PROJECT #2

More is Better...

Yes, You Can Paint  


Tools you will need: 

  1. #6 or #8 watercolour brush, 
  2.  watercolour paper, 140 lb. or heavier
  3. some tissues, an old clean rag
  4.  a white plastic or glass dish to mix your paint in
  5.  two small water containers, one to clean the dirty brush in, one to dip in for clean water
  6. WARM yellow eg. Indian Yellow or New Gamboge
  7. COOL yellow eg.Winsor Lemon, or Hansa Yellow Light 
  8. WARM red eg. Scarlet Lake
  9. COOL red eg. Perm Alizarine/Perm Rose
  10. DioxazineViolet or Thioindigo Violet, any mixed or tube green, Burnt Sienna or Burnt Umber.  Depending on which colours you choose you may have a slightly different result.
STEP ONE
  • Save the black & white image below, print it out and draw the image or trace it on your watercolour paper.
  • Mark where you want the highlights.  These areas you will not wet. 
  • Make separate intense puddles of each colour on your palette. Keep these colours separate
  • Wet one cherry at a time.  Move around the picture so wet edges do not touch. 
  •  You will pretty much do each cherry the same and  in this order: 
  1. wet cherry with clear water (not too runny; let the water soak in a bit,) and avoid your marked highlight areas
  2. drop in the warm yellow far left, then drop in the cool yellow next to that
  3. while still wet, drop in warm red on the left side and the cool red as the cherry turns away from the warm light. let the colours mingle by tipping the paper to allow paint to mix 
  4. deepen each cherry on the shadow side with violet.
  5.  let each cherry dry thoroughly (or use a hair-dryer) before going on to the adjacent cherry so edges stay sharp and crisp.  
  6. when all the cherries are completed to your liking, do each stem starting with a fine line of green and adding burnt umber or sienna on one edge
  7. when everything is thoroughly dry begin the shadow: wet paper close to the bottom of each cherry, carefully drop in a light tone of violet, yellow and perm. rose letting all the colours mingle as they will
  8. darkest colour is right under the cherry. 
  9. gently lift any highlight areas  
Always Brush with Joy!    Toni
FOR MORE INTENSE STEP x STEP INSTRUCTION IN THE LONDON AREA
ASK FOR THE ART GALLERY OF LAMBETH CLASS SCHEDULE BY
CONTACTING THE ARTIST 

YES, YOU CAN PAINT!


Try this simple image and paint it using only one colour.  The best choice of colour to pick is one that is very dark and can be altered simply by adding more water to get lighter & lighter.  I used Sepia, but you could use a dark green, such as Winsor Green, French Ultramarine Blue or a dark red, like Winsor Red or Carmine, or Maroon.  Have some fun and use a dark Violet or Magenta.  

Tools you will need: 

  1. #6 or #8 watercolour brush, 
  2.  watercolour paper, 140 lb. or heavier
  3. some tissues, an old clean rag
  4.  a white plastic or glass dish to mix your paint in
  5.  two small water containers, one to clean the dirty brush in, one to dip in for clean water

 

  • Save the black & white image below, print it out and draw it or trace it on your watercolour paper.  
  • Squeeze out a bit of paint, (you can always squeeze out more), add  clean water a bit at a time to make a creamy puddle.  You need to add water to some of this 'till you have a puddle about the consistency of milk, then from this puddle of paint, begin to put a very light wash (layer of paint) in the shaded areas.  Go lightly, go slowly.  
  • Let it all dry completely each time around.  You can use a hairdryer to gently dry your paper. You then begin to build up the colour in each of the different areas.
  • Gradually get darker (less water & more paint in your puddle) remembering to let each layer dry thoroughly before adding more colour. 
  • You can soften your lines by lightly running a brush slightly wet with clean water just along the edge. Lightly tap the tip of your brush on the dry tissue or rag to remove excess water.  
  • Add as many layers (glazes) of colour as you wish.  When you are happy with the different shades (or values) the next step is to use the darkest value (pigment & very little water) and with a slightly wet brush add the darkest details.  By now you will be getting familiar with how much water to add to your paint.  
  • Think about the contour of the boot as you paint - it's rounded, so your brush strokes should follow that contour.  
  • Lastly add the shadow.  It's ever so subtle.  
  • Leave lots of untouched white areas on the boot.     
  • Practice makes perfect, so don't give up, try again.  
  • You can add a background if you want to give that a try but we'll tackle that another time. 

 For Class information in the London, ON area  contact me for details.  
Always Brush with Joy!    Toni
FOLLOW ON MY BLOG -  http://toni-twogatesartstudio.blogspot.ca/